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Re=Membering History -- Education 430

Social studies education should be grounded in the local experiences and cultures of students and communities, the past and present contexts in which they exist, and learning and constructing stories that center their histories and ways of being and kno

Influences on land use and ownership

Always start with Library Search

 

GOOGLE is a NOT BAD place to start research

Benton Harbor, MI AND St. Joseph, MI

The twin cities are practically photo-negatives of one another: Benton Harbor is 85% Black; St Joseph is about 85% white. In Benton Harbor, more than 45% of residents live below the poverty line; cross the bridge into St Joseph and the poverty rate is just 7%, well below the state average. And while Benton Harbor has struggled for years with lead-contaminated water, those problems have not appeared to plague its neighbor. (The Guardian online https://www.theguardian.com/us)

Detroit 8 Mile Wall

The Detroit Eight Mile Wall, also referred to as Detroit's Wailing WallBerlin Wall or The Birwood Wall, is a one-foot-thick (0.30 m), six-foot-high (1.8 m) separation wall that stretches about 1⁄2 mile (0.80 km) in length. 1 foot (0.30 m) is buried in the ground and the remaining 5 feet (1.5 m) is visible to the community. It was constructed in 1941 to physically separate Black and White homeowners on the sole basis of race. The wall no longer serves to racially segregate homeowners and, as of 1971, both sides of the barrier have been predominantly Black. (Wikipedia)

Ann Arbor District Library Living Oral History Project

 Living Oral History Project, presented in partnership between the African American Cultural & Historical Museum of Washtenaw County and the Ann Arbor District Library. These interviews serve as a road map illustrating what local African Americans witnessed, experienced, and contributed to building the community we share today.