Skip to main content
Library Research Guides

Engineering 100 Section 850

Guide that will help students of Engineering 100 Section 850 with their research assignments

Types of Scholarly Sources

While these sources are usually scholarly, it's possible they may not be. It's important to review a source to make sure it actually is scholarly. Who is the author? Is there a reference list? Was it published in a scholarly book or journal? Please see the "Scholarly or Non-scholarly?" tab for more information about evaluating a resource.

  • Book A lengthy stand-alone work that tells a story or provides an overview of a specific topic. Can be authored by one or two people, or each chapter could be authored by a different person.
  • Book Chapter A distinct section within a book, often focused on one part of the story or one part of the book topic.
  • Conference Proceeding Written documentation of research that has been presented at a conference. Often very similar to a journal article.
  • Dissertation/Thesis A summary of the research process and findings from a graduate student's time studying at a research university.
  • Original Research Article (Journal Article) Written documentation of a new research finding. Often consists of an introduction, background information, discussion of the method used, presentation of findings, what the findings mean, and future work that can be done.
  • Patent A document that describes an invention; contains drawings, specifications, and descriptions.
  • Review Article (Journal Article) A summary of all the research done on a specific topic.
  • Report A summary following an investigation of some sort.

Types of Non-Scholarly Sources

Although these sources are usually not scholarly, they may be the best fit for your project. When citing a non-scholarly source, it's important to consider the context of the resource, the intended audience, any biases that the author may have, and how long ago it was published. Please see the "Scholarly or Non-scholarly?" tab for more information about evaluating a resource.

  • Blog A frequently updated webpage, often consisting of news, personal opinions, or links to information.
  • Book A lengthy stand-alone work that tells a story or provides an overview of a specific topic. Can be authored by one or two people, or each chapter could be authored by a different person.
  • Book Chapter A distinct section within a book, often focused on one part of the story or one part of the book topic.
  • Editorial A short essay presenting a personal opinion, written by or under the supervision of an editor.
  • Magazine Article A factual or topical report or essay published in a magazine.
  • News Article An article published in a newspaper reporting the facts about an event or situation.
  • Newsletter An informal report issued by an organization to provide updates on current activities to its members or other interested parties.
  • Trade Publication A newsletter or magazine targeting an audience in a specific line of work.
  • Webpage A document that lives online and is accessible via a browser. Often includes hyperlinks to other webpages or online documents.

Introduction

There are a variety of types of sources that you will find while conducting library research. This page is intended to help you get a better understanding of what those sources are and how they differ from each other. Please note that there are many more types of sources beyond what is listed below, but these are some of the common ones you will use when conducting research.

Photo of a book report

"Book Report" by Juhan Sonin via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)