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Library Research Guides

Essentials of Library Research

This guide will help you define your topic, find books & articles, evaluate the information you find, and cite your sources.

What is a Scholarly Article?

The Information Cycle

Is this Article Scholarly?

Evaluating What You Find

Use the 5 W's of Information Evaluation to evaluate websites, articles, and books.

Peer Review in 3 Minutes

Have questions about the difference between "scholarly" and "peer reviewed"? This video explains the peer review process. 

Scholarly/Non-scholarly Comparison

 Sometimes it is difficult to determine whether you are reading a scholarly or a non-scholarly article. Here are some clues.

 

Scholarly

Non-scholarly

Content

Detailed report of original research or experiment, lengthy report of an original application of an arts or humanities concept Secondary report or discussion may include personal narrative, opinion, anecdotes.

Author

Author's credentials are given, usually a scholar with subject expertise. Author may or may not be named; often a professional writer; may or may not have subject expertise.

Audience

Scholars, researchers, students. General public; the interested non-specialist.

Language

Specialized terminology or jargon of the field; requires prior knowledge. Vocabulary in general usage; understandable to most readers.

References/

Bibliography

Required. All quotes and facts can be verified. Rare. Scanty, if any, information about sources.

Examples

Research study, lengthy academic discussion of an arts or humanities concept, research review article Editorial, news, book/film review, letters, highlights